What is a UC Certificate (UCC)?

UC stands for Unified Communications and is a newer type of SSL certificate that is designed and primarily used for securing Microsoft Exchange 2007 and Microsoft Office Communications Server 2007 products. The main difference between a UCC SSL and a standard Multi-Domain certificate is that a UCC can secure both internal network names and external domain names as well.

What is the difference between 128- and 256-bit security?

That is the difference between the key lengths used once an SSL connection has been established in the browser. 256-bit security is indeed a bigger key however that does not necessarily mean it is more secure. Experts and research agrees that 128-bit is equally secure for the foreseeable future. The only reason 256-bit security is needed is if it’s specifically required by your industry or company policy. All our certificates have the ability to use either bit-length, which one you use is a matter of server configuration, NOT certificate support.

Where do I get my Intermediate certificate?

An intermediate certificate will be emailed to you along with your SSL certificate. You can also download the intermediate certificate from the vendor’s website, which is something that can be done if you didn’t receive the intermediate via email. This is also sometimes referred to as the “CA Bundle.” It is also important to note that some certificates have multiple intermediate certificates. Below are the links that you can use to download your intermediate certificate from the vendor website: https://knowledge.digicert.com/generalinformation/INFO4331.html https://knowledge.geotrust.com/support/knowledge-base/index?page=content&id=AR1421 https://search.thawte.com/support/ssl-digital-certificates/index?page=content&id=AR1384 https://knowledge.rapidssl.com/support/ssl-certificate-support/index?page=content&id=AR1548 https://support.comodo.com/index.php?/Default/Knowledgebase/List/Index/108/sha-2